Memories of a true Mentor

Memories of a true Mentor: Reading the recollections of "Anonymous", flashed... er BROUGHT back similar memories of my "Freshman experience". The year was 1975 and I too had obtained my private ticket prior to entering the Institute. I also had Harry Anderson as my first instructor. I knew something was "up" when they called my name, assigned me to Harry and all the students in the ready room heaved a big sigh... he was not a man to be trifled with. My first act of endearment came after I'd been checked out in my stilted Musketeer. As always it was a mad house trying to take off at 8:00AM. While taxiing out the tower asked me if I'd accept "Sod Right" of 22. Having flown off of sod strips all my flying life, I accepted. Just then Harry came over the radio: "Did I just hear 10 Romeo just accept sod right of 22?!". The tower responded "Affirmative", and I took off. When I landed he was waiting on the ramp with a look on his face that ANYONE who knows him knows. After giving me the obligatory military chewing out, I told him I never received the handbook when I entered the School, had always flown off of sod fields, didn't know I had to have him check me out first and that NO ONE can screw up a landing on a sod strip! Over the years I have talked to a great number of pilots, and because of the six degrees of separation law, have run into a few (some in taverns) who had him as an instructor. No one will deny that he was one of the best teachers if not the one most memorable people they'd ever met and had their own story to tell. I wonder just how many "Harry Anderson" stories are out there floating around? The next time we went up, of course, I was glad the FAA took spin recovery out of the training program.......

Scott Braukhoff.